Charcoal Grilled Smoke-Roasted Chicken With Lemon & Thyme

  

There is nothing that says comfort food more than a perfect whole roasted chicken.  It is a recipe of few and simple ingredients, but when a few techniques are perfected, the outcome is always delicious and satisfying.  lemon and thyme

 

The first thing to do is season the chicken well with lemon and thyme, which are perfect match for this recipe.  While seasoning the chicken, I also use a liberal amount of salt.  The second technique is to smoke-roast the bird rather than just smoking or just roasting in the oven.  Smoking at low temperature can produce rubbery skin, so I roast my bird over charcoal at higher temperature than I would use for just smoking.   I usually smoke-roast between 300 and 325 degrees.  I prefer to use my large Big Green Egg with a V-Rack and drip pan to catch all those juices to baste with while cooking.   

 

The third technique is to remove the chicken from the grill and let it rest before carving.  The chicken will stay plenty warm and will reabsorb all of the juices.  

 

If you are planning a party or entertaining outside, this is a great dish to prepare ahead of time and serve warm right of the grill. 

 

For the Chicken:

 

1 (4 to 5 – pound) chicken, rinsed and patted dry 

 

For the Seasoning: 

 

2 cloves garlic, chopped

thyme sprigs

1 tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped

½ teaspoon red chili flakes

2 lemons

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil + some to drizzle at the end

1 teaspoon fresh black pepper

1-tablespoon salt, preferably kosher or sea salt

Butchers twine   
 
 lemon chicken

Place inside the chicken ½  tablespoon of the salt, chili flakes, garlic, and thyme sprigs.  Squeeze the juice of one lemon inside the chicken and place the halves of the lemon inside the bird.  Use the butcher’s twine to truss the chicken so it cooks evenly.  Squeeze the juice of the second lemon over the outside of the chicken.  Then rub the out side with the olive oil.  Use the remaining salt, pepper and chopped thyme to season the outside of the chicken and place in a roasting rack. 

 

Preheat a Big Green Egg, Weber Kettle, or other charcoal grill to medium heat building the fire on one side of the grill with the temperature reaching 325 degrees. Place the chicken on the grill with the drumsticks closest to the direct heat, as they will take a little longer to cook.   

 

Cook the chicken for 1 ½  to 2 hours or until the chicken is done when the internal temperature reaches 170 degrees.  Remove the chicken to a warm platter and cover with aluminum foil.  Allow the chicken to rest 10 to 15 minutes before carving to allow all of the juices to be reabsorbed. 

 

Carve the chicken into serving pieces and drizzle with a little more lemon juice and olive oil.   

 

The Hearth and Grill Shop is your Super store for Charcoal Grills and both natural and propane gas grills.  Come by this Saturday to see The Best Charcoal Roasted Chicken recipe in action as we cook on a Big Green Egg.

Charcoal Grill “Terrorized Steak”

 

There are very few brand new ideas in cooking and most of the chefs I know, myself included, are very good at flat iron steakborrowing ideas and improvising them to fit their menu.  The name “Terrorized Steak” is borrowed here from Chef Reed Herron in San Francisco, who borrowed it from Jacques Medecin, who was once the mayor of the city of Nice in France and a cookbook author.  Jacques Medecin, who is best known for his corrupt political career, had a personal motto,  “Beg, borrow, and steal whatever you can”.  So I think he would approve of the use of the name.

 

Enough history!  This is one of our favorite dishes at home because it is quick, affordable, and flavorful.  The “Terrorized” part of the dish references the spicy red chili flake, garlic, and herbs that are part of the wet rub for the steak.  The name also refers to how the herbs and garlic char and create a crust on the steak while grilling.  Beef rib eyes or strip steaks are great for the recipe, but most of the time I prepare it with flat iron steaks, which I slice thin after grilling and serve with roasted baby potatoes and grilled asparagus.

 

For the Spicy Herb Rub:

 

2 Flat Iron Steaks

1 Tablespoon, rosemary, chopped

2 Tablespoon, Italian parsley, chopped

1 Tablespoon, Fresh thyme, chopped

1 Tablespoon, Fresh chives, sliced thin

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 lemon, zest and juice

1 Teaspoon, red chili flakes  (I like to add another teaspoon to increase the Terror)

2 Teaspoon, kosher salt

1 Tablespoon, fresh ground black pepper

2 Tablespoons, extra virgin olive oil

 

mortar

 

 

 

 

 

In a mortar or small food processor combine the herbs, garlic, lemon zest, lemon juice, chili flakes, salt and pepper.  Pulse to combine all the ingredients and stream in the oil to produce a paste.  Rub the paste evenly on both sides of the steaks and allow the steaks to rest at least 30 minutes and up to 1-½ hours before grilling.

 

Preheat a Big Green Egg, Weber Kettle, or other charcoal grill to medium heat.  Grill the steaks, turning occasionally, until crusty on the outside, about 5 to 6 minutes per side.  Transfer the steaks to a warm platter and cover loosely with aluminum foil and allow them to rest for 5 to 10 minutes.

 

When ready to serve, slice the steaks thin against the grain.  Assemble back on the platter and serve with lemon wedges.

 

Come by The Hearth and Grill Shop this Saturday to see and taste this recipe prepared on a Big Green Egg.

Grilled Fish Tacos with Lime & Cilantro Crema

With a new twist on a traditional dish, fish tacos are rising in popularity every year.  Tacos made in the traditional style with beef or chicken have been an American favorite for decades, but this version, grilled and made with fish, is a healthy alternative.  The trend has most restaurants using a fried or battered fish filet, but in this adaption, we are seasoning the fish with an intense rub, then grilling it over either a gas or charcoal flame, for a lighter but still very flavorful taco.  All the accompaniments are made ahead of time and the filets grill quickly, making this an ideal recipe for outdoor picnics, camping or tailgating.

 

For this recipe, we recommend Tilapia as your fish filet of choice.  Tilapia holds up well on the grill, is readily available and affordable.  Some other good choices are Mahi Mahi, Cobia, or Amberjack.  Snapper’s flavor lends itself well in this dish, but the filets are delicate and difficult to grill.

 

Another twist on tradition is salsa.  Since becoming a common addition to the American table, it’s fast replacing ketchup with it’s many interesting flavors from the mild, fresh tomato version to the smoky roasted chili varieties.  For grilled fish tacos, I prefer the tangy salsa Verde, made from tomatillos and cilantro to brighten up the dish.

 

 

                                                                 For the Fishtilapia

1 Pound, fresh Tilapia

Your favorite Dry Jerk Seasoning blend or blackening spice, we like Dizzy Pig’s Jamaican Firewalk seasoning.

Canola or vegetable oil

 

For the Lime-Crema

1 Cup, sour cream

Juice from ½ a lime

1 Teaspoon cilantro, chopped

2 Green Onions, white and green sliced thin

Salt and pepper to taste

In a small mixing bowl combine the sour cream, limejuice, cilantro, and green onions.  Season with salt and pepper and reserve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the Garnish

 

1 Cup Green Cabbage, sliced thin

1 Cup Red Cabbage, slice thin

The other half of the lime

Salt and pepper to taste

In a mixing toss the cabbages with the limejuice, salt and pepper.  Reserve.

 

For the Tomatillo Salsa

 

tomatillos2

1 Pound Tomatillos, husk removed, rinsed, and halved

1 Onion, halved

1 Clove of garlic

1 Jalapeno pepper, halved and seeded

1 Lime

1 Tablespoon Cilantro, chopped

Olive oil

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

Season the onion halves, jalapeno, and tomatillos with olive oil, salt and pepper.  Over medium fire on a gas or charcoal grill, fire roast the onions, jalapeno, and tomatillos until tender, about 15 minutes.  Place the onions, tomatillos, garlic, jalapeno, and lime juice in a blender.  Pulse to combine all the ingredients, if the mixture is too thick; add a couple of tablespoons of water.  Add the cilantro and reseason with salt and pepper.  Pulse again to combine all the ingredients and reserve.  The salsa may be made a couple of days ahead of time and refrigerated until serving time.

 

To Serve:

 

Reserved Cabbage

Reserved Salsa

Reserved Crema

16 Corn Tortillas +

Chopped Cilantro

Lime Wedges

 

Lay the Tilapia fillets out on a baking sheet and a brush the filets with the oil.  Season liberally with the seasoning spice.  Grill over medium heat until the fish is cooked through.  Remove to a warm platter.

 

Warm the corn tortillas on the grill, then double stack them on a serving platter.  Flake some of the grilled fish in to the bottom of the double-stacked tortillas.  Top with the salsa, cabbage, and crema.  Sprinkle on some chopped cilantro and garnish with the lime wedges.

 

The Hearth and Grill Shop is the largest Gas and Charcoal Grill purveyor in middle Tennessee, proudly serving Nashville since 1974.  Visit our retail store this Saturday to sample this Fish Taco recipe straight from a Big Green Egg.

Smoker Roasted Duck Tostada with Coriander-Black Beans and Grilled Tomatillo Salsa on a Smoker Grill

 

 

 

A tostada is a crisp corn tortilla that will be the foundation of this flavorful appetizer. The rich smoked duck, the earthy beans, and the tangy salsa all work together to make a harmonious springtime starter course.  The Big Green Egg or a Weber Kettle is the perfect Smoker Grill for this Hearth and Grill Recipe being cooked this Saturday, April 17, 2010, at our Nashville, TN Grill Store.

 

green_egg_glamour_largeblog

For the Duck:

1 (4 to 5 – pound) Duck, rinsed and patted dry

2 Limes, zest and juice

2 Cloves garlic, minced

1 Teaspoon cumin, ground

1 Teaspoon coriander, ground

2 Teaspoons chili powder

2 Teaspoons, fresh thyme, chopped

2 Teaspoons black pepper, ground

1 Tablespoon Salt (Kosher or Sea Salt)

2 Tablespoons Extra-Virgin olive oil

 

In a small mixing bowl mix the lime juice, lime zest, garlic, cumin, coriander, chili powder, thyme, black pepper, 1 tablespoon of salt, and olive oil together to create a wet rub.  Season the duck inside and out with the wet rub and refrigerate.  The duck should marinate at least 6 hours, but over night is preferable for maximum flavor.

 

For the Tomatillo Salsa:

 

1 Pound Tomatillos, husk removed, rinsed, and halved

1 Onion, halved

1 Clove of garlic

1 Jalapeno pepper, halved and seeded

1 Lime

1 Tablespoon Cilantro, chopped

Olive oil

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

Season the onion halves, jalapeno, and tomatillos with olive oil, salt and pepper.  Over medium fire on a gas or charcoal grill, fire roast the onions, jalapeno, and tomatillos until tender, about 15 minutes.  Place the onions, tomatillos, garlic, jalapeno, and lime juice in a blender.  Pulse to combine all the ingredients, if the mixture is too thick; add a couple of tablespoons of water.  Add the cilantro and reseason with salt and pepper.  Pulse again to combine all the ingredients and reserve.  The salsa may be made a couple of days ahead of time and refrigerated until serving time.

 

For the Black Beans:

 

1⁄2 lbs. dried black beans

1 bay leaf

1 sprig fresh oregano

4 tbsp. olive oil

1 Teaspoon cumin, ground

2 Teaspoons coriander, ground

1 Medium onion, chopped

4 scallions, trimmed and finely chopped

2 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped

1 small green bell pepper, cored, seeded, and finely

chopped

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

1. Sort through beans, discarding any small stones, then rinse under cold running water. Put beans, bay leaf, oregano, and 1 tbsp. of the oil into a large pot, then cover with cold water by 3″. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer, adding more water as needed to keep beans covered, until beans are tender, about 2 hours.

2. Heat remaining 3 tbsp. of the oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Add cumin, scallions, onion, garlic, and green peppers, and sauté, stirring often, until peppers are soft and scallions are golden, about 10 minutes. Season to taste with coriander, salt and pepper, then add to beans. Continue cooking beans, stirring occasionally, for 10–15 minutes. In this dish the beans should not be too soupy, as they will go on top of a tostada.  Adjust seasonings. Remove bay leaf before serving.  Reserve warm.

 

To Smoke Roast and Serve:

 

The marinated duck

Reserved Beans

Reserved Salsa

Tostada

Cilantro leaves, rough chopped

Scallions, sliced thin

 

XL-weber-ranch-kettleblog

Smoke-Roasting the bird, rather than just smoking or just roasting in the oven will produce a tender, moist duck with crisp skin.  Smoking at low temperature can produce rubbery skin, so I roast my previously marinated bird over charcoal at higher temperature than I would use for just smoking.   I usually smoke-roast between 300 and 325 degrees.

 

Smoke Roasted Duck Tostada with Coriander-Black Beans and Grilled Tomatillo Salsa

 

Preheat a Big Green Egg, Weber Kettle, or other charcoal grill to medium heat building the fire on one side of the grill.  Place the cooking grids on the grill and allow them to preheat.

 

Remove the duck from the marinade, allowing some of the excess olive oil to drain off, and season both sides with the remaining salt.  Place the duck in a V- Rack breast side up on the opposite side of the hottest coals.  A good trick is to have the drumsticks the closest to the direct heat, as they will take a little longer to cook.

 

The duck is done when the internal temperature reaches 165 degrees.  Remove the duck to a warm platter and cover with aluminum foil.  Allow the duck to rest 5 to 10 minutes before carving to allow all of the juices to be reabsorbed.  Carve the duck into small bite size serving pieces.

 

This dish can be served on platter family style, individually plated or in small bite size pieces for a Hors de Oeuvre.  To plate as an appetizer, place a tostada in the middle of a plate.  Spoon the beans on to the tostada and top with some of the smoked duck.  Drizzle on the tomatillo salsa and garnish with chopped cilantro and scallions.

 

The Hearth and Grill Shop is your Super store for Charcoal Grills and both Natural Gas and Propane Gas Grills.  Come by this Saturday to see The Best Smoked Duck recipe in action as we cook on a Big Green Egg.
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Tips For Outdoor Grilling Ideas

As we get away from dark skies, the snow and ice, and high heating bills, we begin to feel the effects of spring fever. Folks get the urge to plant something green, to feel the grass underneath our feet, to enjoy blue skies, longer days, warm sunshine and yes -“A Time to Grill”. With spring fever comes spring clean up, and some decisions to be made. Do I clean up the old grill, maybe putting a new burner or cooking grids in it or is it time to pull the trigger on that shiny, new gas grill I have been eyeing through the cold of winter. If you decide to go the second route and purchase a new grill there are some simple tips that can make the process easier. Most of these tips are really answers to questions that we are asked everyday at The Hearth and Grill Shop.outside bbq

 

Tip Number 1 has nothing to do with BTU’s, grilling area, or any other technical information. The first tip is really a question that only you can answer: “What are my grilling needs?”, “ How many people do I normally cook for?”, “ Do I like to entertain and have friends over to outdoor grill out?”, “ Do I prefer searing a steak or do I cook more hamburgers and chicken?”, “ Do I have space for a built-in island grill or is a freestanding grill better for the space available?” All of these questions factor into the size, shape, and type of gas grill you will need.

 

Tip Number 2 ties in closely with the first and that is, “What is my budget?” None of us would go out looking for a new car without an idea of how much we can or are willing to spend. Grills are a discretionary purchase – none of us must have a grill to survive, so a budget can help narrow the choices. Having a budget will help put in to focus the “must have” categories versus bells and whistles.

 

Tip Number 3 is a little more technical, but a simple one for most people. Will I be looking for a propane grill with a tank or will I be looking for a natural gas grill to hook up to the gas in my home? The advantage of a propane grill is that it is portable. If you decide to move, you can carry it with you. You can take a propane grill to the lake or camping. The disadvantage of a propane gas grill is that you seem to only run out of gas about two minutes into grilling the perfect steak. Even if you have a back up tank the moment is lost when you have to change the tank out and start over. The advantage of a natural gas unit is that, is an endless supply of gas and you never have to swap out tanks during the middle of cooking. If you have natural gas established at your home The Hearth and Grill Shop can run a gas line for a natural gas grill. Every gas grill purchased is set up for one of these two gases. Some grills like FireMagic and American Outdoor Grill are field convertible, but they are initially set up for one gas or the other. A common question is which gas is hotter or cooks better. The answer is that they perform the same.

 

Now we get into the meat of it with Tip Number 4. What material is my new outdoor grill made of and what is the quality of that material? Grills with aluminum housings are typically the most affordable. Cast and Sand Cast Aluminum housings are better and still very affordable. The adage “You Get What You Pay For” really applies at this point. The heavier the housing – the longer the grill will last. Just like the car door test, there is the lid test for a gas grill. Open and close the lid on a prospective gas grill. Does the whole grill shake and feel like it is coming apart when you open and close the lid or does it feel sturdy, balanced, and durable? What are the burners made of? Most manufacturers are using stainless steel at this point for burners. The thickness and grade of stainless steel burners are going to have a lot to do with how well the grill performs and how long it will last. The cooking grid material should also be a factor in choosing a grill. The material and thickness of that material will have a lot to do with the way it performs and holds up. We prefer stainless steel cooking grids to steel coated in porcelain enamel or cast iron.

 

At this point, Tip Number 5, it is a good idea to start asking about warranties on the parts that count. The parts that count are the parts that are essential to keeping your grill functioning properly and efficiently. The parts that count are the housing of the grill, the burners, and the cooking grids. Buyer beware – if any of these parts have a 2 year or 3 year warranty, that is probably how long they will last. The rock grate, briquettes, and igniters are relatively low cost items and can easily be replaced if they go bad, so the warranty on these parts is not as high of a priority.

 

Tip Number 6 is a statement! “All that glitters is not gold” and “All that is shiny is not Quality Stainless Steel”. Everyone likes a shiny, big, new stainless steel grill; however, just because a gas grill is stainless steel, does not mean that it will last or keep from rusting. If you are interested in a stainless steel gas grill, settle for nothing higher in grade than 304 stainless. Most manufacturers that produce quality stainless steel grills readily offer the grade of stainless steel used, but if the grade of stainless steel is not evident on the grill you are interested in, try the magnet test. Take a simple refrigerator magnet and see if it will stick to the grill in question. If it is stainless steel and the magnet sticks, it is NOT a grade of stainless you will want to purchase for the long run. 302 and 304 stainless steel have enough nickel in them that a simple magnet will not stick, they will not rust, and this is the material you are looking for. Again, “the get what you pay for” rule applies here as 302 and 304 stainless steel are not inexpensive materials and if you think the deal is to good to be true, it probably is.

 

Now that the outside of the grill has been discussed, Tip Number 7 deals with the interior of the grill. A good rule of thumb is that the more BTU’s or heat that a grill can produce, the heavier the components on the interior should be. High temperatures with lightweight material equals having to replace the burner/burners and cooking grids within a couple of years of purchase. Examining the warranty on the burner and cooking grids ahead of time should be a sign of the quality of the materials on the inside. Brands, such as, FireMagic and Broilmaster produce high temperature grills for searing steaks, fish, etc, but also have lifetime warranties on the burners and cooking grids. The American Outdoor Grill is also a high BTU grill with 15-year warranties on the burner and cooking grids. All three are excellent examples of combining performance with durability.

 

outside free2

Tip Number Eight. After choosing your grill, have it professionally installed and then routinely serviced by a certified technician. Propane grills obviously do not need to be installed, but proper assembly and set up is important to the grills performance. Natural gas grills do have to be installed and may even require a gas line being run. The warranty on the grill may also improve by having the grill professionally installed and you can be sure that your investment will be working at maximum performance and efficiency. Having the grill routinely serviced will keep that grill performing at peak levels and increase its longevity. The Hearth and Grill Shop not only sells the best grills on the market today, but we also install and service everything we sell.

Charcoal Grilled Chicken Under a Brick With Rosemary & Lemon on the Grill this Saturday at Hearth & Grill Shop

What does an every day building material and dinner have to do with each other?  If you want a perfectly grilled whole chicken with crisp skin and moist white and dark meat finished at the same time – try this simple technique.  The chicken should marinate at least 6 hours, but over night is preferable for maximum flavor.  The heat and weight from the brick ensures the chicken will cook evenly and the skin will crisp to grilling Nirvana.

 

For the Chicken:

 

1 (4 to 5 – pound) Chicken

 

With the chicken breast side down on a cutting board, using a chef’s knife or a pair of kitchen shears, cut the chicken alongside the backbone from the neck to the tail.  Repeat on the other side of the backbone and completely remove the backbone from the carcass.

 

Turn the chicken breast side up on the cutting board and with the heel of your hand press down in the center of the bird to crack the sternum.  Press down hard enough to flatten the chicken into two equal attached halves.  Place in a shallow dish for marinating.

 

For the Seasoning/Marinade:

 

2 cloves garlic, chopped

2 tablespoons rosemary, chopped

½ teaspoon red chili flakes

1 lemon, zest and juice, + a little juice to drizzle at the end

2 tablespoons Extra-Virgin olive oil + some to drizzle at the end

1 teaspoon fresh black pepper

1 tablespoon salt, preferably kosher or sea salt

 

In a mixing bowl combine the garlic, rosemary, chili flakes, black pepper, and lemon juice & zest.  Whisk in ½ tablespoon of the salt, then whisk in the oil.

 

For the Brick:

 

2 standard bricks or pavers

Heavy-duty aluminum foil

 

Wrap the bricks or pavers in layers of the aluminum foil and reserve.  

  

  

 

Charcoal Grilled Chicken Under A Brick With Rosemary & Lemon

brickchicken2brickchicken1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preheat a Big Green Egg, Weber Kettle, or other charcoal grill to medium heat building the fire on one side of the grill.  Place the cooking grids on the grill and place the aluminum foil covered bricks inside directly over the fire to also preheat.

 

Remove the chicken from the marinade, allowing some of the excess olive oil to drain off, and season both sides with the remaining salt.  Place the chicken skin side down on the opposite side of the hottest coals.  A good trick is to have the drumsticks the closest to the direct heat, as they will take a little longer to cook.  Place the hot bricks on top of the chicken and cook skin side down until the skin becomes crispy and browned, about 15 to 20 minutes.

 

Set the bricks to the side and turn the chicken over to finish cooking another 15 to 20 minutes.  The chicken is done when the internal temperature reaches 165 degrees.  Remove the chicken to a warm platter and cover with aluminum foil.  Allow the chicken to rest 5 to 10 minutes before carving to allow all of the juices to be reabsorbed.

 

Carve the chicken into serving pieces and drizzle with a little more lemon juice and olive oil.

 

The Hearth and Grill Shop is your Super store for Charcoal Grills and both Natural and Propane Gas Grills.  Come by this Saturday to see The Best Chicken Under a Brick recipe in action as we cook on a Big Green Egg.

Best Grilled Leg of Lamb Recipe Grilling on Big Green Egg Saturday at Hearth and Grill Shop, Nashville, TN

 

 Spring has sprung and Easter is this Sunday.  This Saturday The Hearth and Grill Shop will feature a simple and delicious Grilled Leg of Lamb cooked to perfection on the Big Green Egg.  The preparation time is minimal and the outcome is a flavorful grilled lamb dish, just in time for Easter.  There is not a better way to celebrate Easter, than bringing the wonderful Spring flavors of lamb, lemon, olive oil and fresh herbs together.

 

Best Grilled Leg of Lamb

with Olive Oil Infused with Mint

 

1   7 to 8-lb leg of lamb, butter flied

 

For The Marinade:

 

2 Onions, peeled and sliced

8 Cloves of garlic, crushed

2 Cups dry white wine

1 Cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 Tablespoon chopped Rosemary

1Teaspoon chopped Thyme

Fresh black pepper to taste

 

Combine the onions, garlic, wine, olive oil and herbs in a shallow dish, and then season with pepper to taste.  Place the lamb leg in the dish and turn over to coat well.  Cover and refrigerate for at least 8 hours up to over night.


For the Mint infused Olive Oil:


1 Bunch fresh mint,

1 clove garlic

1 Lemon

1 ½  Cup extra-virgin olive oil

 

Roughly chop the mint and garlic.  Using a blender puree the mint and garlic together.  Squeeze in the juice from the lemon and then stream in the oil to produce a flavor, green oil.  Reserve.

 

Preheat the grill.  Remove the lamb from the marinade and season with salt.  Over medium heat, place the lamb on the grill and cook until medium-rare, about 10 to 12 minutes per side.  Remove the lamb to a warm platter and cover with a piece of aluminum foil to keep warm.  Allow the lamb to rest for 10 minutes before carving to reabsorb the natural juices.  Remove the rested lamb to a cutting board, but reserve the platter.  Carve the lamb into slices and arrange back onto the platter.  Garnish with fresh mint and drizzle with the mint infused olive oil.


Our Hearth and Grill Shop Showroom has the largest selection of Big Green Egg Smoker Grills and Accessories in all of Middle Tennessee.  Come visit us this Saturday to see how a Big Green Egg can cook to Perfection a Grilled Leg of Lamb!

 

Shopping For Vented Gas Logs

 

When shopping for gas logs, the first question you will be asked at The Hearth and Grill Shop is whether you would like vented gas logs or vent-free gas logs.  There are several factors that will go into your decision.

 

Before that decision can be made, here are a few things to be aware of. The way vented and vent free gas logs operate are completely different. They are not interchangeable and an old set of vented gas logs cannot be turned into vent-free.  Vented gas logs operate more closely to a real wood fire than they do their vent-free cousins.

 

The vented gas logs by Real Fyre, sold exclusively at The Hearth and Grill Shop,  provide all the characteristics of real fire and flames without the mess. Eliminated are the hassles of buying or cutting and stacking wood. As effortless as the flip of a switch, you’ll have all the comforts and enjoyment of a real wood fire. No more waking up to a pile of ashes, or worries of hidden embers.
There are several different types of controls for your new vented gas log set. The easiest is a manual gas floor valve on the outside of the fireplace and with a match or wand lighter the fire is lit manually. This manual ignition may be prohibited in some areas (varies from county to county) and local codes may dictate that a safety pilot be required for vented gas logs. A safety pilot system on vented gas logs is recommended for families with young children. A safety pilot eliminates the worry of potential gas leaks in the event the pilot is accidentally blown out or extinguished improperly The remote control makes lighting your new vented log fire fun and easy. The variable remote control puts you in charge of the flame by providing you with an on and of switch, and control of the size of the flame, making this the most popular choice with our customers. The final control choice is the electronic pilot ignition. These units don’t have standing pilots, and only ignite when turned on.
The dimensions of your fireplace and the type of controls will determine what size vented gas logs will be best for any fireplace. A masonry fireplace is only limited in size by your individual taste and have no specific standards for dimensions. Every bricklayer or mason can make a fireplace the size a homeowner desires. When considering a vented gas logs set, it is important to have the following measurements available when coming to the Hearth and Grill Shop.

 

 Please measure:
1. Across the back wall of the fireplace
2. Across the front of the fireplace
3.The depth and height of the fireplace.

 

These dimensions with the controls and gas line

factored in will ensure the perfect size logs for a fireplace.vented gas log

Some positive features of Vented-Gas Logs

o The most realistic looking flame pattern to imitate a real wood fire.
o The flame dances and engulfs logs like a real wood fire.
o The flame is more substantial and has the best ambiance
o The ease of use over wood fires

 

Please keep in mind that vented gas logs are not intended to provide a significant heat source. The fireplace damper must be open during operation, causing the heat to rise and exit. A vented gas logs would be best suited for a room where the fire is there for ambiance and appearance. Depending on how often and how high you choose to burn your flame, a vented gas log set has the potential of using a significant amount of fuel. For your individual circumstances, a vented log set may be just what you are looking for to add that special touch to holidays or any gathering of family and friends.

 

There are many reputable producers of vented gas logs. The Hearth and Grill Shop is proud to say we have carried Peterson, Real-Fyre Vented gas logs for 35 years. Their unmatched quality, realistic appearance, consistency and the availability of more than 40 authentic styles have made Peterson, Real-Fyre Vented gas logs the number one choice of
The Hearth and Grill Shop.

Shopping for Vent Free Gas Logs

 

When shopping for gas logs, the first question you will be asked at The Hearth and Grill Shop is whether you would like vented gas logs or vent-free gas logs.  There are several factors that will go into your decision.

 

Before that decision can be made, here are a few things to be aware of. The way vented and vent-free gas logs operate are completely different. They are not interchangeable and an old set of vented gas logs cannot be turned into vent-free.  Vented gas logs operate more closely to a real wood fire than they do their vent-free cousins.

 

Example of a vent-free firebox
Example of a vent-free firebox

The Hearth and Grill Shop offers over fifteen choices for vent-free gas log sets from three of the leading manufacturers in the United States. Empire Comfort Systems, Real-Fyre by Peterson and Vanguard offer a variety of sizes and styles sure to please even the most discerning eye.

 

But before you can make that decision, let’s go over some of the logistics of vent-free gas log products.

 
A vent-free gas log system operates with the damper closed on a wood burning fireplace or in a UL listed vent-free firebox. Fire box manufacturers include Vanguard, Empire Comfort Systems and Martin Industries. 100% of the heat produced from a vent-free gas log set emits into the room making it not only attractive but an efficient source of heat on a blustery day. With a vent-free gas log set, power outages won’t leave you in the cold. Vent-free gas logs require no electrical power and will be a welcome source of viable heat even if you are in the dark.

 

A vent-free gas log set also uses a fraction of fuel compared to their vented cousin.
The question often comes up as to exactly how do vent-free gas log operate with the damper closed on a fireplace? The first thing that makes a set of gas logs vent-free is the burner is designed to use 99% of all the gas that comes into it. Since all of the gas is combusted, the only byproducts are heat, water vapor and carbon dioxide(the same thing we breathe out).  Vent-free gas logs are not designed to be a primary heat source. They are designed to be an attractive, efficient, and dependable source of supplemental heat. Extended use of vent-free gas logs as a primary heat source isn’t recommended, as water vapor emitted can cause mildew issues over an extended period of time.

 
The second part of the vent-free gas log equation can’t be overstated. It is extremely important that the gas logs themselves  be set up and operated strictly per the manufacturer’s instructions. The gas logs and burner are designed to have the flame move up between and around the logs, but not to be in contact with the gas logs. Proper installation and placement of the logs are paramount in successful and satisfying operation of vent-free gas logs.

 

There are several different types of controls for a vent-free gas log system. The most cost effective is manual control on the valve of the unit. This manual valve turns the unit on and off and the flame up and down. Please bear in mind a manual control unit cannot be upgraded to another control type. The next option is the remote ready or Millivolt units that can be turned on and off from a switch or an on/off remote control. The remote ready units also have the ability to be controlled with various forms of thermostats or a wall switch. Due to the number of different types of control and the fact a remote can be added at any time, the remote ready units are the most popular. Variable flame remote controls are available from some manufacturers, such as, Peterson and Empire Comfort Systems. Variable remote control units boast the capability of being able to control your flame as well as turning it on and off.

 

The dimensions of your fireplace and the type of controls will determine what size vent-free gas log will be best for any fireplace. A masonry fireplace is only limited in size by your individual taste and have no specific standards for size. Every bricklayer or mason can make a fireplace the size a homeowner desires. When considering a vent-free gas log set, it is important to have the following measurements available when coming to The Hearth and Grill Shop.

 

Please measure:
1. Across the back wall of the fireplace
2. Across the front of the fireplace
3.The depth and height of the fireplace.

 

These dimensions with the controls and gas line

factored in will ensure the perfect size logs for a fireplace.

It's important to always consult a professional for the best results

It's important to always consult a professional for the best results

The positive features of Vent Free Gas Logs are:
o The best heat output the fireplace may obtain.
o Higher efficiency and less gas consumption.
o Less pollution
o Availability of various types of controls.

 

Though a vent-free gas log set has many features that their vented cousin can’t claim, a draw back of a vent-free set is that by nature of the way it must operate to be vent-free, their realistic look of wood can’t be reproduced as intricately. Also, with many new products, proper installation of a new vent-free log set will help eliminate the odors associated with its initial use. Another factor to take into consideration is that vent-free log sets emit enough heat that a hood may need to be installed. The hood will eliminate any possibility of damage caused from heat emissions from operating your vent-free log set with a closed damper in a fireplace setting.

 
The Hearth and Grill Shop has been proud to carry our vent-free products from Empire Comfort Systems, Real-Fyre by Peterson and Vanguard for over twenty years. Efficiency, dependability, appearance and savings on your gas bill have made vent-free gas logs a great investment and one of the most sought after items by The Hearth and Grill Shop customers.